Research Continuity

Expand all | Collapse all

Databrary is a powerful tool for sharing and reusing video for research

  • 1.  Databrary is a powerful tool for sharing and reusing video for research

    Posted 03-31-2020 18:30

    Join Databrary if you have not already as a way to store and share videos from your lab and many labs around the world (databrary.org). And use of the free Datavyu coding tool allows for flexible behavioral coding that is time locked to videos (as well as options to transcribe and export to CLAN etc.)

    Our lab has found DB to be a lifesaver in ensuring research continuity in our transcribing and coding of videos that we've gathered. And, DB has thousands of videos available to anyone who joins the DB community (free).

    Be sure that you have secure access processes in place for remote coding of videos, which is possible and being done by many labs. At that point, you can make use of any available videos without a need to contact the researchers who have shared the videos (just use the DOI of the study from which you draw). I have used videos in classes, asking students to generate coding systems and then to present actual data on what they've done. 




    ------------------------------
    Catherine Tamis-Lemonda
    Professor
    New York NY
    212-998-5399
    ------------------------------


  • 2.  RE: Databrary is a powerful tool for sharing and reusing video for research

    Tummler
    Posted 04-10-2020 09:17
    Hi Cathie,
    Thanks for posting about Databrary. This is a great resource. Could you share some of the classroom activities/videos you've used, maybe in the Teaching Materials community? I know there was an active thread on resources for Methods classes online on the CDS listserv.​

    ------------------------------
    Chuck Kalish
    SRCD
    Washington DC
    ------------------------------



  • 3.  RE: Databrary is a powerful tool for sharing and reusing video for research

    Posted 04-14-2020 20:14

    Hi Chuck,

    Thanks for asking! First off, it takes no time at all to join Databrary (which is free), and once logged on, you can search for video excerpts from labs around the globe. This is a great way to share videos with students from actual studies (not just writing about it on lecture notes). 

    But beyond using videos for teaching, I have uploaded videos from our lab (or used videos from other labs) and then assigned students a project in which they have to develop a research question, conduct a literature review on the topic, and then develop coding systems to apply to the videos; actually code the videos; crunch the numbers; analyze the data; and then present findings to the class at the end of semester. This can also be done in teams. (Note: This works better for smaller classes, not huge lectures!). So, for example, during my course Infancy, I gave students "read" access to a subset of videos from my lab that were uploaded onto DB. I then taught a class on "coding" behaviors from videos, which reviewed event-based coding; time sampling; likert ratings, etc. (Happy to share the notes from the lecture with anyone). THEN students watched videos on their own to develop questions. An example was 1 student who asked about strategies parents use to get their toddlers to sit and share a book during reading activities. The student coded various behaviors in mom and child and related them to one another. Another student watched videos of children at play, and asked about what infants were doing when they showed specific emotions. Another student used still-face paradigm videos to code infant reactions (I tell students it's okay for them to ask questions already in studies prior, to see if they can replicate what authors found), etc. The final classes contain presentations by all students on their findings, in a formal way. I was amazed by the creativity in student questions. This approach works well remotely when students must keep busy, and can't be in class. One important thing to bear in mind is the importance of secure video access and following guidelines around confidentiality and so forth. There are ways to ensure students log in and view videos without downloading them to personal computers at home. DB teams are currently working out various ways to ensure this secure access.



    ------------------------------
    Catherine Tamis-Lemonda
    Professor
    New York NY
    212-998-5399
    ------------------------------