Building an Antiracist Society

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Debriefing with Experts on 7/8 from 4-5pm ET: Drs. Gabriela Livas Stein and Margaret O'Brien Caughy

  • 1.  Debriefing with Experts on 7/8 from 4-5pm ET: Drs. Gabriela Livas Stein and Margaret O'Brien Caughy

    Posted 07-08-2020 15:42
    Edited by Staff SRCD 07-14-2020 15:27

    This thread includes the discussion from the recent debriefing session with Drs. Gabriela Livas Stein and Margaret O'Brien Caughy. This session is a continuation of the conversation from the 6/30 SRCD webinar, "Becoming an Antiracist Society: Setting a Developmental Research Agenda." 
    If you missed the webinar, the recording is available here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X_lGmFVkShw

    We encourage all community members to respond to any posts below to keep the discussion going!



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    SRCDStaff
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  • 2.  RE: Debriefing with Experts on 7/8 from 4-5pm ET: Drs. Gabriela Livas Stein and Margaret O'Brien Caughy

    Posted 07-08-2020 15:56
    What should we do as Editors, Associate Editors, and reviewers to support the development of antiracism in our publications and publication processes?

    Posted by @Rebecca White

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    SRCDStaff
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  • 3.  RE: Debriefing with Experts on 7/8 from 4-5pm ET: Drs. Gabriela Livas Stein and Margaret O'Brien Caughy

    Posted 07-08-2020 16:01

    I think this needs to be addressed on a number of fronts. First, it is critically important to increase the diversity of editors, associate editors and reviewers, regardless of the ethnic composition of the papers being submitted. That is, more scholars of color need to be included in the review process at all levels, not just for publications focused on populations of color.

    Second, editors need to proactively provide constructive feedback to reviewers who identify the need for a White comparison group in their reviews of papers focused on populations of color. This could even be a part of the guidance given to reviewers in advance.

    Finally, journals should expand their policies requiring samples to be contextualized in the abstract and methods. For Child Development in particular, this will require increasing the current word limit for abstracts of papers submitted to Child Development.



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    Margaret Caughy
    University of Georgia
    Athens GA
    706-542-4831
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  • 4.  RE: Debriefing with Experts on 7/8 from 4-5pm ET: Drs. Gabriela Livas Stein and Margaret O'Brien Caughy

    Posted 07-08-2020 16:02
    How can anti-racism be incorporated into our theoretical frameworks? Should Critical Race Theory (from sociology) be incorporated into our thinking?



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    SRCDStaff
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  • 5.  RE: Debriefing with Experts on 7/8 from 4-5pm ET: Drs. Gabriela Livas Stein and Margaret O'Brien Caughy

    Posted 07-08-2020 16:18
    Edited by Gabriela Stein 07-08-2020 16:17
    Yes, critical race theories as well as other theories that emerged from other disciplines like intersectionality are already being integrated into developmental science but this has been principally done by scholars that work with BIPOC populations. And it is critical that other scholars also incorporate some of this work into their theories to explicate the role of race, power, privilege, oppression, and Whiteness into their understanding of key developmental phenomena. It is imperative that as a field we all examine our theories through these critical lenses and learn from other disciplines that have tackled how race may be present but "invisible" in our scientific work. Further, critical race theories name race is a social construct that promote power and privilege of White groups and an important question to ask ourselves as a society is how do our scientific questions promote and privilege certain type of outcomes, methods, populations, etc that continue to support the racial status quo. See below for some good initial readings and developmental work that incorporates critical race theories and intersectionality. Importantly, you should cite the original developers of work - especial Black feminist scholars where a lot of this work developed!

    Critical Race Readings:
    Delgado, R., & Stefancic, J. (2012). Critical race theory: An introduction. New York, NY: NYU Press.

     Crenshaw, K. W. (1991). Mapping the margins: Intersectionality, identity politics, and violence against women of color. Stanford Law Review, 43(6), 1241–1299. doi:10.2307/1229039.

    Collins, P. H. (2000). Black feminist thought: Knowl- edge, consciousness, and the politics of empower- ment (2nd ed.). New York: Routledge.

    Bonilla-Silva, E. (2009). Racism without racists: Color-blind racism and the persistence of racial inequality in the United States (2nd ed.). Boulder, CO: Rowman & Littlefield.

    Feagin, J. R. (2006). Systemic racism. New York: Routledge.

    De Reus, L., Few, A. L., & Blume, L. B. (2005). Multicultural and critical race feminisms: Theorizing families in the third wave. In V. Bengtson, A. Acock, K. Allen, P . Dilworth-Anderson, & D. Klein (Eds.), Sourcebook of family theory and research (pp. 447 – 468). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

    Dill, B. T., & Zambrana, R. E. (2009). Emerging intersections: Race, class, and gender in theory, policy, and practice. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press.

    In Developmental science:
    Yoo, H. C., Kim, A. Y., & Lee, R. M. (2018). Race and subjective well-being: Critical race perspective and empirical review of key predictors. Handbook of well-being. Salt Lake City, UT (USA): DEF Publishers. DOI: nobascholar. com.

     Syed, M., Santos, C., Yoo, H. C., & Juang, L. P. (2018). Invisibility of racial/ethnic minorities in developmental science: Implications for research and institutional practices. American Psychologist73(6), 812.

     Ghavami, N., Katsiaficas, D., & Rogers, L. O. (2016). Toward an intersectional approach in developmental science: The role of race, gender, sexual orientation, and immigrant status. In Advances in child development and behavior (Vol. 50, pp. 31-73). JAI.

    Santos, C. E., & Toomey, R. B. (2018). Integrating an intersectionality lens in theory and research in developmental science. New directions for child and adolescent development2018(161), 7-15.

    Juang, L. P., Yoo, H. C., & Atkin, A. (2017). A critical race perspective on an empirical review of Asian American parental racial-ethnic socialization. In Asian American Parenting (pp. 11-35). Springer, Cham.



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    Gabriela Stein
    Greensboro NC
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  • 6.  RE: Debriefing with Experts on 7/8 from 4-5pm ET: Drs. Gabriela Livas Stein and Margaret O'Brien Caughy

    Posted 24 days ago
    Edited by Cristina Granda 24 days ago
    In a course on learning anti-racism taught by Dr. Niral Shah here at University of Washington, we read a book by Dr. Zeus Leonardo, which reviewed several major theories on race. I highly recommend it as an entry point to understanding the various approaches to race in research. 

    Leonardo, Z. (2014). Race Frameworks: A Multidimensional Theory of Racism and Education. New York: Teachers College Press.

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    Cristina Granda
    University of Washington
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  • 7.  RE: Debriefing with Experts on 7/8 from 4-5pm ET: Drs. Gabriela Livas Stein and Margaret O'Brien Caughy

    Posted 07-08-2020 16:10
    How can we better diversify study populations? What are the best ways to effectively reach and recruit underserved populations to participate in research?

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    SRCDStaff
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  • 8.  RE: Debriefing with Experts on 7/8 from 4-5pm ET: Drs. Gabriela Livas Stein and Margaret O'Brien Caughy

    Posted 07-08-2020 16:15
    In my experience, employing members of the community is more effective relative to using graduate students. Community members with experience working in community-based agencies often have many connections and trust already built up with community members. It is also important to interface with important community brokers prior to starting your study.

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    Margaret Caughy
    University of Georgia
    Athens GA
    706-542-4831
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  • 9.  RE: Debriefing with Experts on 7/8 from 4-5pm ET: Drs. Gabriela Livas Stein and Margaret O'Brien Caughy

    Posted 07-08-2020 16:19
    What are the implications of having white researchers taking up the racial research cause now?

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    SRCDStaff
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  • 10.  RE: Debriefing with Experts on 7/8 from 4-5pm ET: Drs. Gabriela Livas Stein and Margaret O'Brien Caughy

    Posted 07-08-2020 16:33
    Edited by Gabriela Stein 07-08-2020 16:33
    This is a really important question because it is key that BIPOC scholars be recognized for the expertise they have in doing work on racism and development in marginalized communities. As the calls for research on systemic racism start to come from foundations, NSF, NIH, and others, it is important that scholars who have been doing this work be recognized and included as PIs of this work (not just consultants), be senior leadership, and lead authors. Doing this work is not just a new area to explore or branch into but requires a lot of training in methodology and collaboration with community. So senior White researchers can support those that have been doing this work by offering to support BIPOC scholars doing this work by reading/reviewing grants or lend expertise on their methodologies.  White researchers might consider taking the racial cause not up from the populations that are targeted but considering doing work in the development of racism, hate, and other forms of oppression or take a deeper dive into their own research questions and how race may have been invisible in the work they have been doing. White researchers can partner with BIPOC scholars making sure to listen to the voices of these scholars and their expertise, and ensure that ALL research teams have someone with expertise on communities included in the sample. 

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    Gabriela Livas Stein
    Greensboro NC
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  • 11.  RE: Debriefing with Experts on 7/8 from 4-5pm ET: Drs. Gabriela Livas Stein and Margaret O'Brien Caughy

    Posted 07-08-2020 16:26
    How will you address socioemotional (SEL) research and ensure we're not perpetuating a racist/ white supremacist framework?

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    SRCDStaff
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  • 12.  RE: Debriefing with Experts on 7/8 from 4-5pm ET: Drs. Gabriela Livas Stein and Margaret O'Brien Caughy

    Posted 07-08-2020 16:34
    Socioemotional learning research is an area for which it is critical that within group research be conducted. Developmental work, such as focus group research, is needed to develop an understanding of how parents in different groups conceptualize emotion expression in their children and how that affects their socialization strategies. One person who is doing excellent work in that area is Fantasy Lozada at VCU who is study emotion socialization in African American families.

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    Margaret Caughy
    University of Georgia
    Athens GA
    706-542-4831
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  • 13.  RE: Debriefing with Experts on 7/8 from 4-5pm ET: Drs. Gabriela Livas Stein and Margaret O'Brien Caughy

    Posted 24 days ago
    I also recommend the work that Dr. Christy McWayne and Dr. Jacquie Mattis are doing on positive parenting perceptions among parents who are Black and have children enrolled in Head Start. 

    McWayne, C. M., Mattis, J, S., Wright Green, L., & Limlingan, M. C., & Harris, E. (2016). An emic, mixed-methods approach to defining and measuring positive parenting among low-income Black familiesEarly Education and Development, 28, 182-206.

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    Cristina Granda
    University of Washington
    Seattle WA
    530-848-4187
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  • 14.  RE: Debriefing with Experts on 7/8 from 4-5pm ET: Drs. Gabriela Livas Stein and Margaret O'Brien Caughy

    Posted 07-08-2020 16:40
    Can anyone speak on mixed race youth? Where do you stand on what language we should use?

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    SRCDStaff
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  • 15.  RE: Debriefing with Experts on 7/8 from 4-5pm ET: Drs. Gabriela Livas Stein and Margaret O'Brien Caughy

    Posted 07-08-2020 16:59
    The Multiracial population in the United States and around the world is growing although it is very important to note that this population has existed in society for a long time but that strict racial boundaries have limited their ability to identify in this way.In fact, it was not until the 2000 census that Multiracials could select multiple racial groups. There are many terms that been used including mixed race, Biracial, Multiracial, Multiethnic, and multicultural and it is important to consider your sample and how this question is posed in terms the sample. As with any term we elect to use, there is no "right" answer so you want to be thoughtful with the term. Some folks eschew the term "mixed race" because it lends it self to the perception that the person has identity conflicts or has connotations with animal breeding, but others have embraced the term and think that Multiracial connotes a group of people instead of an individual. What is important to consider however is how you ask the question may give you different responses as someone who is of mixed heritage may not always identify as Multiracial but instead consider themselves as monoracial or may identify in other ways. So if you use the word "identify" to describe your sample (e.g., 30% of the sample identified as White, 40% Black, and 20% Multiracial), then you want to make sure that the question that was posed to your group included the option to identify as Multiracial as opposed to assuming that identity that way who checked of a list of groups to which they belonged and then you as the researcher classified folks as Multiracial those who checked off multiple boxes.  Just because a person checked off multiple racial groups does not mean they identify as Multiracial or Biracial.  So the key here is how you ask your demographic questions and then how use that in your sample descriptions and being careful to use the identity that folks self-label as.

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    Gabriela Stein
    Greensboro NC
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  • 16.  RE: Debriefing with Experts on 7/8 from 4-5pm ET: Drs. Gabriela Livas Stein and Margaret O'Brien Caughy

    Posted 07-08-2020 16:40
    What are standard measures of experienced racial discrimination for minority communities that we can include as standard research practice?

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    SRCDStaff
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  • 17.  RE: Debriefing with Experts on 7/8 from 4-5pm ET: Drs. Gabriela Livas Stein and Margaret O'Brien Caughy

    Posted 07-08-2020 16:55
    There are a number of measures, each with their own strengths, weaknesses, and particular uses. A handy resource that summarizes a number of measures of discrimination was a report by the CDC and the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health entitled "Expanding our understanding of the psychosocial work environment: A compendium of measures of discrimination, harassment, and work-family issues". A copy of the report can be found at: https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/2008-104/pdfs/2008-104.pdf?id=10.26616/NIOSHPUB2008104. It's a bit old (2008) but it's a place to start. If someone has an updated review of measures of discrimination, please share! If not, this would be an important contribution to the field.

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    Margaret Caughy
    University of Georgia
    Athens GA
    706-542-4831
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  • 18.  RE: Debriefing with Experts on 7/8 from 4-5pm ET: Drs. Gabriela Livas Stein and Margaret O'Brien Caughy

    Posted 07-08-2020 16:48
    Is there a way that SRCD could help senior researchers as well as more junior scholars to get up to speed with the skills and understanding that are important for working with people from cultural backgrounds different than their own?  And especially, for setting up their methods and interpreting their findings when the people in their studies have different backgrounds than the researcher's own background?

    Partnering with researchers that have this expertise would be one way -- but how could the research field itself increase general understanding of the importance of cultural expertise?

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    Barbara Rogoff
    Santa Cruz CA
    831-459-3763
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  • 19.  RE: Debriefing with Experts on 7/8 from 4-5pm ET: Drs. Gabriela Livas Stein and Margaret O'Brien Caughy

    Posted 07-08-2020 16:58
    I think this is an excellent recommendation, Barbara! I think one thing that SRCD could do to advance this effort would be to sponsor specific learning opportunities, either through webinars, special topics conferences, pre-conferences to the biennial, or sessions during the biennial itself. It would be nice if it could have some longevity to the model - not a "one and done" approach. I'm thinking about the scholar development program, something that starts out with a kick off event but has follow-up components and opportunities for more senior researchers to have regular engagement with scholars who have the cultural expertise over time.

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    Margaret Caughy
    University of Georgia
    Athens GA
    706-542-4831
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